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20121101
20121130
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CSPAN2 11
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Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Nov 23, 2012 10:30am EST
that the famous tank commander along with a bunch of panthers and effectively drove the british back into egypt. now when the summer rolls around things quiet down and it's terribly hot and they would seize the two sides to begin, and then in the fall of 1941 there was again advanced by the british into libya in hopes of driving back the forces he turned around and pushed the british back again and all the way this time sort of disastrously all the way deep into egypt, deeper than they had ever been before. so, when the american soldiers arrived, the allies i should say and the axis forces were dug in and testing each other in a place which was about 60 miles west of alexandria close enough to alexandria which was the british naval center in egypt close enough to cairo to be really extremely dangerous and i think frightening to all the allies on the suez canal or the middle eastern oil fields and just as they are now, there were critical to the british war effort so it was a tense moment and important and on september september 3rd they steamed up the red sea, unloaded and went off to the train
CSPAN
Nov 7, 2012 11:00pm EST
, tunisia and egypt. the u.s. institute of peace post this to our discussion. >> good morning, everyone. i am steven heydemann, middle east initiative at the u.s. institute of peace and we are delighted to see you all here at today's session on security sector reform in the arab world. i think some of those who rsvp may have been scared away by the false rumor that you would be subjected to a political polling experience following the panel. that's not the case that you don't need to worry about that. were very pleased to have you out here with this morning. i would like to stress that our topic this morning i think is both particularly important, but also especially urgent. i don't think that it is an exaggeration to say that what happens with the security sectors in the arab world over the coming year or so, and by security service, i mean the police, the armed forces and most of all of course the very substantial intelligence apparatus is that exist in every arab country, that what happens with those sectors of the bureaucracy in the arab world will let her sleep determined the fate of
CSPAN
Nov 10, 2012 12:00pm EST
. and then they reached suez in egypt on september 3rd, 1942. now, i should probably give a little background on the war in north africa. historians when they talk about it tend to use metaphors like seesaw, pendulum. it was this peculiar sort of rhythm of war that began in the fall of 1940. mussolini had visions of grandeur, i guess, wanted to ride his white stallion down the streets of cairo. he had trooped in libya when was an italian colony, and he decided to make a play for cairo, attack the british going east. the british attacked right back and went, drove the italians pretty far west into libya at which point hitler realized he really needed to bail out his pal, mussolini, although i don't think he was happy about it. so he sent in irwin rommel, the famous tank commander, along with a bunch of perhapsers, and he effectively drove the british back into egypt. now, when the summer rolls around, things would kind of quiet down. it was terribly hot, and the campaigning would sort of cease, the two sides would dig in, and then in the fall of 1941 there was again an advance by the british into libya i
CSPAN
Nov 5, 2012 11:00pm EST
interest for america first? if you take a look at egypt, under the original plan, we gave tremendous amounts of foreign aid to the state of egypt. egypt is threatening israel. egypt is threatening the region because of the arab spring. we have to rethink the dollars that we are sending to egypt. we have to say that these dollars are for maintaining a security and peace and if you are not participating, you do not get these dollars. that is job one. we have to continue our commitment of foreign policy to israel. israel is our strongest ally and our sister country come and we need to do everything we can fulfill our to fulfill our commitment. all of the foreign aid is spent right here in america un-american jobs. that is when the requirements. we need to gather up our allies and protect the people who serve in our state department we can secure them, they shouldn't be there. >> moderator: i'm going to go forward, but what you think should be the basic guiding principles, speaking a bit more probably? berg: if you are referring to dollars spent, or in general, our foreign policy, americ
CSPAN
Nov 3, 2012 8:00am EDT
the path of at least my path as a fighter pilot. i came back from egypt, i've been overseas for six years at the good life. i lived in europe. you guys in the military know you get to travel and do things. so most of the capital cities, you know, a lot of neat things you don't normally see. used to keep a horse by the pyramids. i mean, how cool is that to go riding into the peer nodes. but i wanted to come home. i have not a sonnet worker in a long time and haven't ended to resort to this open past 8:00 at night for a long time and i wanted to come home and i did. i got selected to attend the fighter weapons school out of malice, which is the air force version of the navy school. i darted down the navy school, kind of an abbreviated exchange. it is okay, but they're not half of what we are. because the air force? okay, good. never mind the football game today, that's irrelevant. the whole taking off and landing on a carrier. it's a good school, but wasn't anything like ours. ours is six months long and utterly miserable. i came out of that a change to the reading. some say for the better.
CSPAN
Nov 3, 2012 6:00pm EDT
to egypt with carter and sadat. i used to work for "the new york times." jim and i met in 1975, also, covering the bicentennial, election conquered. and we've been friends ever since throughout all the came pains, and i've seen sam over the campaigns. and jeanne livingston has been an associate for many years. >> what's this photograph? >> yes. that's the photograph that sort of symbolizes campaigning today and what the press has to go through. what we're seeing here is a rope line where the advance people for a certain candidate, in this case the dukakis people, try and control the press. that is, their movements, their acksess, where they're to go and not to go. and what had been happening in the dukakis campaign is we would land in an airport. there would be two advance people and there would be a clothe line, and they had like a mobile pin, instead of just a closed off pin, where the press would be able to go to. they got this wonderful idea of having a mobile pen. so you had two people, one with rope in each hand, running around making makeshift pens where the press could go. we
CSPAN
Nov 20, 2012 12:00pm EST
into the arab spring. in egypt last year, when they can shut down the internet, shutdown global service, many asked how are they able to do that. what does it mean they can do that? is a very important question. but let me focus on another important question that fewer people asked. how did egypt come to have an internet and the mobile service worth shutting down? the short answer lies in the most important policy a congressman of the clinton administration that most people, present company excluded, have never heard of. world trade organization agreement on basic telecommunications. back in the 1990s, monopolies operated communications networks in most countries around the world, generally government owned or controlled monopoly. that was the world most of us grew up in. it was before the internet and mobile communications took off, and it's not a coincidence that the end of that world coincided with a takeoff of mobile and internet. in any event, back then in the '90s, leaders at the white house, as stated above, commerce department, and yes the fcc, develop what many thought at the time wa
CSPAN
Nov 4, 2012 12:00pm EST
the librarian in alexandria, egypt, for instance. i hope i am not mangling his name to badly. roughly measure the world with not much more than, you know, a calendar and the sun and the big stick in the ground. and when you see that extraordinary sense of developing knowledge about the natural world, that comes out of your curiosity, that is what i think i'm talking about when i talk about kids natural curiosity and how we have to keep telling the stories to fire up their imagination and creativity. >> host: zero contrarian tweet sent to you, these days history class is tend to focus almost exclusively on the underrepresented groups mentioned. do we spend -- are we to eurocentric? to spend too much time on the magellan and columbus? >> tina, that's a good question. i think it has been somewhat addressed. some people think that it has swung too far. i know, for instance, there were some concerns a few years ago that there were history standards coming out that did not mention robert e. lee. on the other hand, there are the texas state textbooks which have been the subject -- subject of some co
CSPAN
Nov 10, 2012 9:00am EST
people made these very extraordinary discoveries. i talk about the librarian in alexandria, egypt, eratosthenes. of i'm not mangling his name too badly who roughly measured the world without much more than a calendar and the sun and a big stick in the ground. when you see that extraordinary sense of developing knowledge about the national -- natural world that comes out your curiosity that is what i'm talking about what i talk about kids's natural security of a city and how we have to keep telling these stories to fire up their imagination and their creativity. >> guest: history classes focus almost exclusively on the underrepresented groups mentioned. are we too for course been too much, and magellan and columbus and so on? >> that is a good question and it has been somewhat addressed, some people think that it has one too far. for instance there was some concern a few years ago that their history stand is coming that the dimension robert e. lee and on the other hand the texas textbooks have been a subject of controversy because they spend more time talking about jefferson davi
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)